Monthly Archives: March 2013

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Twitter tools

See on Scoop.itCalling All Lecturers

Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

This site is for school teachers but I think even lecturers in HE could find the information about using Twitter helpful.

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

Are edutech startups plugging an innovation gap in our universities?

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Does technological innovation have to come from within the sector? Claire Shaw hears from the current wave of edutech players with their roots firmly in higher education

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

I like this article not just because of the edutech angle but because it says, "[students] are taking the [learning] experience online themselves".  Hurrah!  Yes this is just what we are seeing students starting up their own Facebook groups etc.  What this article is saying is that this activiety is the result of universities not providing the right kind of technology tools for students.  Yes, that is fine for those students who will/can do this for themselves – don’t we owe it to the other 50% of students who need the university to provide guidance in the form of the tools it provides?

See on www.guardian.co.uk

Digital Connectedness: Maximising the Potential of Your Network / The Employability Hub

See on Scoop.itCalling All Lecturers

Aimed at educators but with relevance to us all from EHub Supporter, Sue Beckingham of Sheffield Hallam University. The Employability Hub is a social learning community for helping…

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

Thank you to David Shindler for bringing this to my attention.  A very useful slide show to use when explaining the relationship of digital literacy to employability.

See on dash.bloomfire.com

U-Now – University of Nottingham

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U-Now is The University of Nottingham’s collection of open educational materials that have been openly licenced for anyone to use. The materials range from complete modules to smaller-scale learning objectives and highlight a range of teaching and learning activities from across the University.

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

A great resource for OER from Nottingham.  Why aren’t more universities doing this sort of thing?  Any answers?

See on unow.nottingham.ac.uk

Avoiding Common Online Training Content Mistakes

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  Online training courses are meant to be convenient, cost-effective alternatives to seminars and other forms of training that usually put most people to

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

How very useful.  This is just the advice I would give to anyone teaching, training or engaging online or using blended learning.  Use the right tools, avoid too much content, keep the really important stuff to less than 5 minutes (even within a lecture), make sure your technology works, get the students to tell you what the best bits are and what other things they would have liked you to include (you then know what to chuck out).

See on coggno.com

JISC CETIS – The roles of libraries and information professionals in Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives |

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This report contains the findings of a study carried out by the Centre for Academic Practice & Learning Enhancement and Centre for Educational Technology and Interoperability Standards, at the University of Strathclyde. The study focuses on the involvement of the Library as an organizational unit, and of individual librarians and other information science specialists, in open educational resources (OER) initiatives. This research study contributes to the current Open Educational Resources Programme, an initiative by JISC and the HEA whose objective is to promote the creation, dissemination, access and use of OER. This programme represents a firm commitment by UK Higher Education institutions to the OER movement.

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

May be we ought to remember this August 2012 report when we are talking about Open Access.  Although research is important and occupies our thoughts at the moment, Open Access is about a whole lot more than just research.

See on www.bibliofuture.nl

BioMed Central | RCUK’s Open Access Policy

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Open access means that there are no barriers to the research, no paywalls: all research content is made freely and openly available, to anyone around the world. Rather than charging a subscription for people to read the research, researchers pay an Article Processing Charge (APC) at the point of publication.

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

If you want a quick summary of Open Access from the point of view of the Research Councils just watch this video.  The video is produced by Springer but you don’t get the advert until the end 🙂

See on www.biomedcentral.com

Book now available. Into the Wild – Technology for Open Educational Resources

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With great pleasure and more relief I can now announce the availability of Into the wild – technology for open educational resources, a book of our reflections on the technology involved in three years of the UK OER Programmes.

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

Hurrah!  Thanks Phil, may be now we will all start doing "real" OER.  Well we can hope 🙂  It’s amazing just how much OER is shut off behind a corporate front or inside a VLE. May be Into the Wild will encourage people to put their fantastic and even not so fantastic stuff out in the wild.

See on blogs.cetis.ac.uk

Education Technology Success Stories

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In this paper, Darrell West and Joshua Bleiberg highlight five success stories of innovations in education technology.

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

That’s better the other version was too long 🙂  Do read this paper, yes this is a USA paper and yes it is about teaching in school rather than HE but the points raised are of value to us here too.

See on www.brookings.edu

9 Tools to Create E-magazines and Newspapers for Your Class ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

See on Scoop.itCalling All Lecturers

Karen Johnson‘s insight:

Don’t mind re-scooping this at all – some very easy to use and helpful tools here.

See on www.educatorstechnology.com